On Publicity

You know we’re the reason Justin Bieber is famous, right?

And the same goes for anyone who did not rise to stardom ‘the old fashioned’ ways: Being born into it, or having parents with the right connections. Bieber, DC Young Fly, and a host of other internet stars exploded onto the scene around 8-10 years ago. We shouldn’t be surprised. We ‘liked’ their videos, we commented about their potential, and gave feedback. We typed ‘rofl’ so many times, that many of these new stars couldn’t help but take it as a compliment. So why the hate? Just below the surface of our love for these ‘self-made’ celebrities exist this contingent of fans who despise them. Not for what they are, or what they’ve done, necessarily–but because of what the represent. Let’s take Justin Bieber. He posted videos of himself singing, and singing well. Comments, likes, and shares lead to more publicity; which in turn lead to these videos being seen by record executives. Bieber put in the work, and got the opportunity to shine. And so shine he did. Is that not the idea immigrants think of when coming to America? Started from the bottom? For some reason, I feel like as a whole; we’d prefer to be the success story. Know body really cares about THAT guy making it big. We only care when WE do. So while we’re throwing bottles at his concerts, or throwing bottles at her stand-up; we are also practicing our own routines.

We’re sharping any modicum of skill we have because we know that at the end of the day…

WE

COULD

GET

A

SHOT

…..MAYBE.

The flipside to all of this, the media. Ever been checking your timeline on Facebook or Twitter and come across something like this?

“Fred Jones sent a private message to Cali Rogers, the infamous pornstar!”

Do you click? Do you scroll? Or do you click and scroll? 🙂

Seriously though, it’s really incredible what passes for news nowadays. Sure lousy reporting isn’t new, but we get completely engrossed in it online. Pseudo-celebrities being caught with pot, or some washed-up boxer being charged with indecent exposure. It’s like pop culture media has transformed into one giant tabloid, right? And why?

Because you let them.

….

…….

……

The clicks? The likes? The shares?

We honestly can’t complain when we click and read. It’s like the old adage on the internet; be careful sharing a post that you don’t agree with. All the time you see people posting fights, and violent acts, and questionable political memes about this or that–with little to no context. And unfortunately, I believe there is a large portion of our population that has begun to think and interact in real life (IRL) the way they do on Facebook. So the jokes, the silly philosophies about sex or drugs that are often meant as jokes; are being taken seriously. Not good. Don’t get me started on the wild frontier that is the internet and it’s thin, vague veil of a code of conduct. Do whatever you want, you don’t really have to worry about the consequences; unless you’re an idiot. And even that’s not a true statement anymore, because even the idiotic part of our population is computer literate now. What a time and place we live in! I guess to come full circle, we trash Justin Bieber like he’s just the worst person on Earth. People send him death threats, money, love letters, and gifts. If you really think about it–Bieber is one of us…a dude that honed his craft, got noticed, and is now a star. He’s kind of dimmed recently, but his story is still a tremendous one to consider, even if you don’t really like the guy. And publicity as a whole has done a lot of positive things too–#blacklivesmatter and the Trayvon Martin saga. But it’s definitely a double-edged sword.

Canadian singer Justin Bieber attends the Cinema Against AIDS amfAR gala 2014 held at the Hotel du Cap, Eden Roc in Cap d'Antibes, France, 22 May 2014, during the 67th annual Cannes Film Festival. Photo by: Hubert Boesl/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images
Canadian singer Justin Bieber attends the Cinema Against AIDS amfAR gala 2014 held at the Hotel du Cap, Eden Roc in Cap d’Antibes, France, 22 May 2014, during the 67th annual Cannes Film Festival. Photo by: Hubert Boesl/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s